Tuesday, 31 December 2013

Basic tips for freezing food

Freezing is one of the simplest and least time consuming ways to save money, by preparing food in advance or saving excess amounts from going to waste. A full freezer is more energy efficient.  

I use these cute labels on my frozen foods. They can be used for months or for different types of food. For example you could use the red circle for all meat dishes or all dishes frozen in May.
 
Foods which DO NOT freeze well:
Cabbage, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, parsley, radishes, whole celery
Cream or custard fillings, milk sauces, sour cream
Cooked egg whites, icings made from egg whites
Fried foods
Fruit jelly, gelatine
Mayonnaise (it separates; use salad dressing instead)
Sour cream (it becomes thin and watery)
Cooked macaroni, spaghetti or rice
 
Storage times for basic products:
Bacon - one month
Butter or margarine - nine months
Cheese:
- Dry-cured cottage cheese, ricotta two weeks
- Natural, process three months
Cream - two months
Whipped cream - one month
Fish or shellfish:
- 'Fatty' fish, three months
- 'Lean' fish, six months
- Shellfish, three months
Fruits (except citrus) - eight to twelve months
Citrus fruits and juices - six to eight months
Ham - two months
Meat, ground or stewing - three months
Meat, cooked or leftover - two to three months
Fresh beef or lamb roasts - twelve months
Fresh pork or veal roasts - eight months
Fresh beef steak - twelve months
Fresh lamb or veal chops/steak - nine months
Fresh pork chops - four months
Fresh variety deli meats - four months
Poultry:
- Cooked, with gravy, six months
- Cooked, no gravy, one month
- Duck or Goose, six months
- Uncooked (whole), chicken or turkey, 12 months
- Uncooked chicken pieces, nine months
- Uncooked turkey pieces, six months
Vegetables - eight to twelve months
Yoghurt (regular, plain) - one month
Yoghurt (regular, flavoured) - five months
 
Freezer ideas:
Freeze vegetables for no waste
We found that too much money was being wasted on vegetables that were not eaten in time, and would 'go off'. This little method has fixed the problem! As soon as we return from the shops, I peel, chop, bag and freeze my vegetables. Not only have I saved money, but they cook in less than half the time. It really works! None of our vegetables go to waste anymore, we save money as well.

Bulk buy and freeze:
Our family loves meat so I always buy it in bulk on special and freeze in a freezer bag or plastic container. We enjoy our meat even more at half the usual price!

Frozen foods inventory:
Keep a frozen foods inventory near the freezer and keep it up-to-date by listing the foods and dates of freezing as you put them in the freezer. Check them off as you take them out. By keeping an inventory, you will know the exact amounts and kinds of foods that are in the freezer at all times. It also helps to keep foods from being forgotten!
 
Freeze leftover wine into ice cubes for cooking
If you don't want to waste leftover wine, simply pour it into an ice-cube tray and freeze it. When you next need wine with for cooking, simply take out a wine ice cube and use it. Easy!

Freeze tomato paste
Don't let leftover tomato paste or puree go to waste. I buy a large tin of tomato puree and freeze it in blocks in an ice cube tray. Keep the blocks frozen in bags and just use them as needed. Each one is equivalent to about a teaspoon of paste in taste, they are convenient and don't go off. The cost comes out at least as good as the jars of paste.

Freezer packs: You can never have too many freezer packs! we have 6.
 I hope you enjoyed my freezing tips.
Just remember to use your food in the correct time frame for best results!
♥ Lady Creativity

Monday, 30 December 2013

Hose reel - best idea ever!

On the weekend my husband bought a hose reel for our hose in the backyard.
It can extend out for 30 metres, so it just makes our back fence.
It can swivel  180 degrees around to match your position.
 
However when we bought it, it was a yucky yellow colour.
So my husband Ryan sprayed it a nice shade of grey to match our décor. What a lifesaver it is, as it looks much neater than 30 metres of hose laying around everywhere.
 
If you enjoyed this post, keep updated via social media:

https://www.facebook.com/LadyCreativity http://instagram.com/ladycreativity8 http://www.pinterest.com/ladycreativity8/
 
https://twitter.com/LadyCreativity8 https://www.youtube.com/user/LadyCreativity8/videos
 
http://www.ladycreativity.com/feeds/posts/default
 
Lady Creativity

Sunday, 29 December 2013

Decorative Formula Tin Container

This idea came from a friend. She let her children decorate their left over formula tins. This made me think that I could decorate my left over tins with wallpaper to suit my décor in my house.

 
1. The first thing you need is left over tins. I used formula tins, however you could really use any tin.
2. The second thing you need is wallpaper or wrapping paper. My local craft store lets you have 20cm free samples of any wallpaper. So I got an assortment to this project and some I had already at home.
3. Once you have both of these, use a ruler to measure the diameter of your tin (around the edge circle) and the length from top to bottom.
4. Then use the pen to draw a rectangle with these measurements onto your paper. You will need to carefully cut this out, so you don't have a jagged edge.
5. Then apply the glue evenly to the back. I used standard PVA glue.
6. Carefully wrap it around the tin and apply pressure to allow it to evenly stick to the tin.
7. I used some rubber bands to make sure the paper stuck evenly. I only left them on for about 5 minutes and then removed them to make sure they didn’t leave a dent there.
8. Leave to dry for a few hours and your new tin is ready to use.
 
If you enjoyed this post, keep updated via social media:

https://www.facebook.com/LadyCreativity http://instagram.com/ladycreativity8 http://www.pinterest.com/ladycreativity8/
 
https://twitter.com/LadyCreativity8 https://www.youtube.com/user/LadyCreativity8/videos
 
http://www.ladycreativity.com/feeds/posts/default
 
Lady Creativity

Ham, spring onion, spinach & feta quiche recipe


This is one of our family favourites! A delicious and filling main course.
Serve with hot chips or wedges. Makes 8 servings

 
 
 
Ingredients:
2 sheets ready-rolled pastry
100g chopped ham
200g crumbled feta cheese
100g spinach leaves chopped
150g grated cheese
1 whole spring onion chopped
2 teaspoons nutmeg powder
6 eggs

 
Method:
1. Spray or brush oil over the surface area of your pie dish. Use pastry to line base and sides of a 20cm pie dish. Trim excess pastry.

2. Preheat oven and a baking tray to 180°C. Place dish on hot tray. Bake pastry case for 10 to 12 minutes or until light golden. Remove from oven.

3. Spread ham, feta, grated cheese, spring onion and spinach.

4. Beat eggs and salt and pepper to taste in a jug. Add some of your nutmeg and beat it through the eggs until well mixed. Pour into pastry case.

5. Bake for 25 minutes or until set in the centre. Let it cool and sit for 5 minutes, then slice and serve.
 
If you enjoyed this post, keep updated via social media:

https://www.facebook.com/LadyCreativity http://instagram.com/ladycreativity8 http://www.pinterest.com/ladycreativity8/
 
https://twitter.com/LadyCreativity8 https://www.youtube.com/user/LadyCreativity8/videos
 
http://www.ladycreativity.com/feeds/posts/default
 
Lady Creativity

Saturday, 28 December 2013

White currant plants

 The white currant is a variety of the red currant. It is a deciduous shrub growing to 1 metre tall and masses of berries in summer. The white currant differs from the red currant only in the colour and flavour of the fruits. Currant bushes do best in partial to full sunlight. They are relatively low-maintenance plants. White Currant is a small shrub, that fruits early summer, best grown in cool climates.
 
Bare-rooted currant varieties are widely available and container-grown currants can be planted all year round, as long as the soil isn't frozen or waterlogged. If possible, buy a two-year-old plant - once planted it will remain productive for almost 20 years.
 
At the moment I have 3 plants waiting to be planted in our upcoming new vegie patch that is still getting built.
 
Grow currants in well-drained soil, which has been enriched by adding plenty of well-rotted manure. Choose a slightly sheltered spot, and although plants prefer full sun, they will tolerate dappled shade.
 
If you enjoyed this post, keep updated via social media:

https://www.facebook.com/LadyCreativity http://instagram.com/ladycreativity8 http://www.pinterest.com/ladycreativity8/
 
https://twitter.com/LadyCreativity8 https://www.youtube.com/user/LadyCreativity8/videos
 
http://www.ladycreativity.com/feeds/posts/default
 
Lady Creativity

Thursday, 26 December 2013

Frozen herbs in olive oil or water

So you have a ton of fresh herbs and not sure what to do with them. How about making frozen olive oil herb cubes. Preserving herbs in oil  or water reduces some of the browning and freezer burn that herbs can get in the freezer. It’s so easy!

Some folks do freeze soft herbs in bags without any water or oil, which essentially preserves them by drying them out. It's also a great way to have herbs ready immediately for winter stews, roasts, soups, and potato dishes. These dishes usually cook with oil, so you can take a cube of frozen herb cube out of the freezer and use this as the base of your dish.  You can even cook the onions and garlic in this herb-infused oil and let the taste of herbs spread through your whole dish.
 
Steps:
1. Chop up herbs.
 
2. Put the chopped herbs in an empty and clean ice tray. Add olive oil or water.
 
3. Freezer over night in the freezer. Use when you need them for cooking.  
 
If you enjoyed this post, keep updated via social media:

https://www.facebook.com/LadyCreativity http://instagram.com/ladycreativity8 http://www.pinterest.com/ladycreativity8/
 
https://twitter.com/LadyCreativity8 https://www.youtube.com/user/LadyCreativity8/videos
 
http://www.ladycreativity.com/feeds/posts/default
 
Lady Creativity

Share this